top of page
  • Stuart Benson

Summer drought causes hay scarcity, beef producers suffer

While the hot, dry summer was great for swimming, it has wreaked havoc on the region's farmers, particularly those who raise beef, a product that has become increasingly more in demand since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Victor Drury said that his farm usually produces around 3,500 bales a year, but estimates this year he will end up with around half of that by the end of the second cut, meaning Drury will have to sell a large number of his herd in January when the cows are still underweight and thus have less value. Low Down file photo
Victor Drury said that his farm usually produces around 3,500 bales a year, but estimates this year he will end up with around half of that by the end of the second cut, meaning Drury will have to sell a large number of his herd in January when the cows are still underweight and thus have less value. Low Down file photo

Cheryl Layer, owner of Alcovia Angus farm in Alcove and president of the Outaouais chapter of the Union of Agricultural Producers, said that her farm and many other regions are working with 40 to 60 per cent of their normal hay yield for this time of year.